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А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я


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Chapter I.

Contains the Conversation referr'd to in the last Chapter of the preceding Book.

Miss Glanville, who with a malicious Pleasure had secretly triumph'd in the Extravagances her beautiful Cousin had been guilty of, was now sensibly disappointed to find they had had so little Effect on her Father and Brother; for instead of reflecting upon the Absurdities to which they had been a Witness, Mr. Glanville artfully pursu'd the Subject Arabella just before had been expatiating upon, taking notice frequently of some Observations of hers, and by a well contriv'd Repetition of her Words, oblig'd his Father a second Time to declare that his Niece had spoken extremely well.

Mr. Glanville taking the Word, launch'd out into such Praises of her Wit, that Miss Glanville, no longer able to listen patiently, reply'd, 'T was true Lady Bella sometimes said very sensible Things; that 'twas a great Pity she was not always in a reasonable Way of thinking, or that her Intervals were not longer-- Her Intervals, Miss, said Glanville, pray what do you mean by that Expression?-- Why, pray, said Miss Glanville, don't you think my Cousin is sometimes a little wrong in the Head? Mr. Glanville at these Words starting from his Chair, took a Turn a-cross the Room in great Discomposure, then stopping all of a sudden, and giving his Sister a furious Look-- Charlotte, said he, don't give me Cause to think you are envious of your Cousin's superior Excellencies-- Envious, repeated Miss Glanville, I envious of my Cousin--I vow I should never have thought of that--Indeed, Brother, you are much mistaken; my Cousin's superior Excellencies never gave me a Moment's Disturbance-- Tho' I must confess her unaccountable Whims have often excited my Pity-- No more of this, Charlotte, interrupted Mr. Glanville, as you value my Friendship-- No more of it-- Why, really Son, said Sir Charles, my Niece has very strange Whimsies sometimes. How it came into her Head to think Mr. Tinsel would attempt to carry her away, I can't imagine? For after all, he only prest rather too rudely into her Chamber, for which, as you see, I have forbidden his Visits.

That was of a Piece, said Miss Glanville sneeringly to her Brother, with her asking you if you had made Mr. Tinsel swear upon your Sword, that he would never again attempt to carry her away; and applauding you for having given him his Liberty, as the generous Atermens did on the same Occasion. I would advise you, Charlotte, said Mr. Glanville, not to aim at repeating your Cousin's Words, till you know how to pronounce them properly.

Oh! that's one of her superior Excellencies, said Miss Glanville.

Indeed, Miss, said Glanville very provokingly, she is superior to you in many Things; and as much so in the Goodness of her Heart, as in the Beauty of her Person-- Come, come, Charles, said the Baronet, who observ'd his Daughter sat swelling and biting her Lip at this Reproach, personal Reflections are better avoided. Your Sister is very well, and not to be disparag'd; tho' to be sure, Lady Bella is the finest Woman I ever saw in my Life.

Miss Glanville was, if possible, more disgusted at her Father's Palliation than her Brother's Reproaches; and in order to give a Loose to her Passion, accus'd Mr. Glanville of a Decrease in his Affection for her, since he had been in Love with her Cousin; and having found this Excuse for her Tears, very freely gave vent to them-- Mr. Glanville being softned by this Sight, sacrificed a few Compliments to her Vanity, which soon restor'd her to her usual Tranquillity; then turning the Discourse on his beloved Arabella, pronounc'd a Panegyrick on her Virtues and Accomplishments of an Hour long; which, if it did not absolutely persuade his Sister to change her Opinion, it certainly convinc'd his Father, that his Niece was not only perfectly well in her Understanding, but even better than most others of her Sex.

Mr. Glanville had just finish'd her Eulogium, when Arabella appear'd; Joy danc'd in his Eyes at her Approach; he gaz'd upon her with a Kind of conscious Triumph in his Looks; her consummate Loveliness justifying his Passion, and being in his Opinion, more than an Excuse for all her Extravagancies.


Chapter XIV. | The Female Quixote | Chapter II.