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А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я


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Chapter III.

Which concludes with an authentic Piece of History.

Arabella, during the rest of this Journey, was so wholly taken up in contemplating upon the last Adventure, that she mixed but little in the Conversation. Upon their drawing near Bath, the Situation of that City afforded her the Means of making a Comparison between the Valley in which it was placed (with the Amphitheatrical View of the Hills around it) and the Valley of Tempe.

'Twas in such a Place as this, said she, pursuing her Comparison, that the fair Andronice delivered the valiant Hortensius: And really I could wish, our Entrance into that City might be preceded by an Act of equal Humanity with that of that fair Princess.

For the Gratification of that Wish, Madam, said Mr. Glanville, it is necessary some Person should meet with a Misfortune, out of which you might be able to relieve him; but I suppose the Benevolence of your Disposition may be equally satisfied with not finding any Occasion, as of exercising it, when it is found.

Though it be not my Fortune to meet with those Occasions, replied Arabella, there is no Reason to doubt but others do, who possibly have less Inclination to afford their Assistance than myself: And it is possible, if any other than the Princess of Messina had happened to pass by, when Hortensius was in the Hands of the Thessalians, he would not have been rescued from the ignominious Death he was destined to, merely for killing a Stork.

How! interrupted Sir Charles, put a Man to Death for killing a Stork! Ridiculous! Pray, in what Part of the World did that happen? Among the Indians of America, I suppose.

No, Sir, said Arabella, in Thessaly; the fairest Part in all Macedonia, famous for the beautiful Valley of Tempe, which excited the Curiosity of all Travellers whatever.

No, not all, Madam, returned Sir Charles; for I am acquainted with several Travellers, who never saw it, nor even mentioned it; and if it is so famous as you say, I am surprised I never heard of it before.

I don't know, said Arabella, what those Travellers thought worthy of their Notice; but I am certain, that if any Chance should conduct me into Macedonia, I would not leave it till I saw the Valley of Tempe, so celebrated by all the Poets and Historians.

Dear Cousin, cried Glanville, who could hardly forbear smiling, what Chance, in the Name of Wonder, should take you into Macedonia, at so great a Distance from your own Country? And so, said Sir Charles, this famous Valley of Tempe is in Turky. Why you must be very fond of travelling, indeed, Lady Bella, if you would go into the Great Mogul's Country, where the People are all Pagans, they say, and worship the Devil. The Country my Cousin speaks of, said Mr. Glanville, is in the Grand Signor's Dominions: The Great Mogul, you know, Sir-- Well, interrupted Sir Charles, the Great Mogul, or the Grand Signor, I know not what you call him: But I hope my Niece does not propose to go thither.

Not unless I am forcibly carried thither, said Arabella; but I do determine, if that Misfortune should ever happen to me, that I would, if possible, visit the Vale of Tempe, which is in that Part of Greece they call Macedonia.

Then I am persuaded, replied Sir Charles, you'll never see that famous Valley you talk of; for it is not very likely you should be forcibly carried away into Turky.

And why do you think it unlikely, that I should be carried thither? interrupted Arabella.

Do not the same Things happen now, that did formerly? And is any thing more common, than Ladies being carried, by their Ravishers, into Countries far distant from their own? May not the same Accidents happen to me, that have happened to so many illustrious Ladies before me? And may I not be carried into Macedonia by a Similitude of Destiny with that of a great many beautiful Princesses, who, though born in the most distant Quarters of the World, chanced to meet at one time in the City of Alexandria, and related their miraculous Adventures to each other? And it was for that very Purpose they met, Madam, said Mr. Glanville, smiling.

Why, truly, said Arabella, it happened very luckily for each of them, that they were brought into a Place where they found so many illustrious Companions in Misfortune, to whom they might freely communicate their Adventures, which otherwise might, haply, have been concealed, or, at least, have been imperfectly delivered down to us: However, added she, smiling, if I am carried into Macedonia, and by that means have an Opportunity of visiting the famous Vale of Tempe, I shall take care not to draw the Resentment of the Thessalians upon me, by an Indiscretion like that of Hortensius .

For be pleased to know, Sir, said she, addressing herself to her Uncle, that his killing a Stork, however inconsiderable a Matter it may appear to us, was yet looked upon as a Crime of a very atrocious Nature among the Thessalians; for they have a Law, which forbids, upon Pain of Death, the killing of Storks; the Reason for which is, that Thessaly being subject to be infested with a prodigious Multitude of Serpents, which are a delightful Food to these Sorts of Fowls, they look upon them as sacred Birds, sent by the Gods to deliver them from these Serpents and Vipers: And though Hortensius, being a Stranger, was pardoned through the Intercession of the Princess Andronice, they made him promise to send another Stork into Thessaly, to the end that he might be reputed innocent.


Chapter II. | The Female Quixote | Chapter IV.