на главную | войти | регистрация | DMCA | контакты | справка |      
mobile | donate | ВЕСЕЛКА

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я


моя полка | жанры | рекомендуем | рейтинг книг | рейтинг авторов | впечатления | новое | форум | сборники | читалки | авторам | добавить
фантастика
космическая фантастика
фантастика ужасы
фэнтези
проза
  военная
  детская
  русская
детектив
  боевик
  детский
  иронический
  исторический
  политический
вестерн
приключения (исторический)
приключения (детская лит.)
детские рассказы
женские романы
религия
античная литература
Научная и не худ. литература
биография
бизнес
домашние животные
животные
искусство
история
компьютерная литература
лингвистика
математика
религия
сад-огород
спорт
техника
публицистика
философия
химия
close

Essays

Essays
Название: Essays
Автор:Graham Paul
Оценка: 4.9 из 5, проголосовало читателей - 8
Жанр: компьютерная литература
Содержание:

скрыть содержание

  1. Programming Bottom-Up
  2. Lisp for Web-Based Applications
  3. Incremental Development
  4. Interactive Toplevel
  5. Macros for Html
  6. Embedded Languages
  7. Closures Simulate Subroutines
  8. Beating the Averages
  9. The Secret Weapon
  10. The Blub Paradox
  11. Aikido for Startups
  12. Notes
  13. Javas Cover
  14. Being Popular
  15. 1 The Mechanics of Popularity
  16. 2 External Factors
  17. 3 Brevity
  18. 4 Hackability
  19. 5 Throwaway Programs
  20. 6 Libraries
  21. 7 Syntax
  22. 8 Efficiency
  23. 9 Time
  24. 10 Redesign
  25. 11 Lisp
  26. 12 The Dream Language
  27. Notes
  28. Five Questions about Language Design
  29. Guiding Philosophy
  30. Open Problems
  31. Little-Known Secrets
  32. Ideas Whose Time is Returned
  33. Pitfalls and Gotchas
  34. The Roots of Lisp
  35. The Other Road Ahead
  36. The Next Thing?
  37. The Win for Users
  38. City of Code
  39. Releases
  40. Bugs
  41. Support
  42. Morale
  43. Brooks in Reverse
  44. Watching Users
  45. Money
  46. Customers
  47. Son of Server
  48. Microsoft
  49. Startups but More So
  50. Just Good Enough
  51. Why Not?
  52. Notes
  53. What Made Lisp Different
  54. Why Arc Isn Especially Object-Oriented
  55. Taste for Makers
  56. Good design is simple.
  57. Good design is timeless.
  58. Good design solves the right problem.
  59. Good design is suggestive.
  60. Good design is often slightly funny.
  61. Good design is hard.
  62. Good design looks easy.
  63. Good design uses symmetry.
  64. Good design resembles nature.
  65. Good design is redesign.
  66. Good design can copy.
  67. Good design is often strange.
  68. Good design happens in chunks.
  69. Good design is often daring.
  70. Notes
  71. What Languages Fix
  72. Succinctness is Power
  73. Hypothesis
  74. Metrics
  75. Design
  76. Comparison
  77. The Taste Test
  78. Restrictiveness
  79. Readability
  80. To What Extent?
  81. Languages, not Programs
  82. Revenge of the Nerds
  83. Catching Up with Math
  84. What Made Lisp Different
  85. Where Languages Matter
  86. Centripetal Forces
  87. The Cost of Being Average
  88. A Recipe
  89. Appendix: Power
  90. Notes
  91. A Plan for Spam
  92. _ _ _
  93. _ _ _
  94. _ _ _
  95. _ _ _
  96. _ _ _
  97. Appendix: Examples of Filtering
  98. Appendix: More Ideas
  99. Appendix: Defining Spam
  100. Notes:
  101. Design and Research
  102. Better Bayesian Filtering
  103. Tokens
  104. Performance
  105. Future
  106. Notes
  107. Why Nerds are Unpopular
  108. The Hundred-Year Language
  109. Notes
  110. If Lisp is So Great
  111. Hackers and Painters
  112. Notes
  113. Filters that Fight Back
  114. Notes
  115. What You Can Say
  116. The Conformist Test
  117. Trouble
  118. Heresy
  119. Time and Space
  120. Prigs
  121. Mechanism
  122. Why
  123. Pensieri Stretti
  124. Viso Sciolto?
  125. ABQ
  126. The Word "Hacker"
  127. The Python Paradox
  128. Great Hackers
  129. Edisons
  130. More than Money
  131. The Final Frontier
  132. Interesting
  133. Nasty Little Problems
  134. Clumping
  135. Recognition
  136. Cultivation
  137. Notes
  138. The Age of the Essay
  139. Mods
  140. No Defense
  141. Trying
  142. The River
  143. Surprise
  144. Observation
  145. Disobedience
  146. Notes
  147. What the Bubble Got Right
  148. 1. Retail VC
  149. 2. The Internet
  150. 3. Choices
  151. 4. Youth
  152. 5. Informality
  153. 6. Nerds
  154. 7. Options
  155. 8. Startups
  156. 9. California
  157. 10. Productivity
  158. Whats New
  159. Notes
  160. Bradleys Ghost
  161. Made in USA
  162. Notes
  163. What Youll Wish Youd Known
  164. Upwind
  165. Ambition
  166. Corruption
  167. Curiosity
  168. Now
  169. Notes
  170. How to Start a Startup
  171. The Idea
  172. People
  173. What Customers Want
  174. Raising Money
  175. Not Spending It
  176. Should You?
  177. Notes
  178. A Unified Theory of VC Suckagepad
  179. Notes
  180. Undergraduation
  181. Hacking
  182. Math
  183. Everything
  184. Jobs
  185. Grad School
  186. Notes
  187. Writing, Briefly
  188. Return of the Mac
  189. Notes
  190. Why Smart People Have Bad Ideas
  191. The Artix Phase
  192. The Still Life Effect
  193. Muck
  194. Hyenas
  195. A Familiar Problem
  196. Copper and Tin
  197. Notes
  198. The Submarine
  199. Symbiosis
  200. Buzz
  201. Online
  202. Notes
  203. Hiring is Obsolete
  204. Market Rate
  205. Product Development
  206. Trend
  207. Investors
  208. The Open Cage
  209. Risk
  210. The Man is the Customer
  211. Grad School
  212. Experience
  213. A Public Service Message
  214. Notes
  215. What Business Can Learn from Open Source
  216. Amateurs
  217. Workplaces
  218. Bottom-Up
  219. Startups
  220. Notes
  221. After the Ladder
  222. Inequality and Risk
  223. Investors
  224. Founders
  225. Growth
  226. Wealth and Power
  227. Notes
  228. What I Did this Summer
  229. Age
  230. Morale
  231. What Got Learned
  232. Independence
  233. Notes
  234. Ideas for Startups
  235. Questions
  236. Upwind
  237. Doodling
  238. Problems
  239. Wealth
  240. Design for Exit
  241. The Woz Route
  242. Notes
  243. The Venture Capital Squeeze
  244. The Solution(s)
  245. How to Fund a Startup
  246. Friends and Family
  247. Consulting
  248. Angel Investors
  249. Seed Funding Firms
  250. Venture Capital Funds
  251. Stage 1: Seed Round
  252. Stage 2: Angel Round
  253. Step 3: Series A Round
  254. Deals Fall Through
  255. Notes
  256. Web 2.0
  257. Origins
  258. 1. Ajax
  259. 2. Democracy
  260. 3. Don Maltreat Users
  261. The Common Thread
  262. Notes
  263. How to Make Wealth
  264. The Proposition
  265. Millions, not Billions
  266. Money Is Not Wealth
  267. The Pie Fallacy
  268. Craftsmen
  269. What a Job Is
  270. Working Harder
  271. Measurement and Leverage
  272. Smallness = Measurement
  273. Technology = Leverage
  274. The Catch(es)
  275. Get Users
  276. Wealth and Power
  277. Notes
  278. Good and Bad Procrastination
  279. How to Do What You Love
  280. Jobs
  281. Bounds
  282. Sirens
  283. Discipline
  284. Two Routes
  285. Notes
  286. Are Software Patents Evil?
  287. Notes
  288. The Hardest Lessons for Startups to Learn
  289. 1. Release Early.
  290. 2. Keep Pumping Out Features.
  291. 3. Make Users Happy.
  292. 4. Fear the Right Things.
  293. 5. Commitment Is a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy.
  294. 6. There Is Always Room.
  295. 7. Don Get Your Hopes Up.
  296. Speed, not Money
  297. Notes
  298. How to Be Silicon Valley
  299. Two Types
  300. Not Bureaucrats
  301. Not Buildings
  302. Universities
  303. Personality
  304. Nerds
  305. Youth
  306. Time
  307. Competing
  308. Notes
  309. Why Startups Condense in America
  310. 1. The US Allows Immigration.
  311. 2. The US Is a Rich Country.
  312. 3. The US Is Not (Yet) a Police State.
  313. 4. American Universities Are Better.
  314. 5. You Can Fire People in America.
  315. 6. In America Work Is Less Identified with Employment.
  316. 7. America Is Not Too Fussy.
  317. 8. America Has a Large Domestic Market.
  318. 9. America Has Venture Funding.
  319. 10. America Has Dynamic Typing for Careers.
  320. Attitudes
  321. How To Do Better
  322. Capital Gains
  323. Immigration
  324. A Good Vector
  325. Notes
  326. The Power of the Marginal
  327. Outsiders
  328. Insiders
  329. Tests
  330. Anti-Tests
  331. Risk
  332. Delegation
  333. Focus
  334. Less
  335. Responsibility
  336. Audience
  337. Hacking
  338. Inappropriate
  339. Notes
  340. The Island Test
  341. Copy What You Like
  342. How to Present to Investors
  343. 1. Explain what you e doing.
  344. 2. Get rapidly to demo.
  345. 3. Better a narrow description than a vague one.
  346. 4. Don talk and drive.
  347. 5. Don talk about secondary matters at length.
  348. 6. Don get too deeply into business models.
  349. 7. Talk slowly and clearly at the audience.
  350. 8. Have one person talk.
  351. 9. Seem confident.
  352. 10. Don try to seem more than you are.
  353. 11. Don put too many words on slides.
  354. 12. Specific numbers are good.
  355. 13. Tell stories about users.
  356. A Students Guide to Startups
  357. Plus
  358. Minus
  359. Now
  360. Notes
  361. The 18 Mistakes That Kill Startups
  362. 1. Single Founder
  363. 2. Bad Location
  364. 3. Marginal Niche
  365. 4. Derivative Idea
  366. 5. Obstinacy
  367. 6. Hiring Bad Programmers
  368. 7. Choosing the Wrong Platform
  369. 8. Slowness in Launching
  370. 9. Launching Too Early
  371. 10. Having No Specific User in Mind
  372. 11. Raising Too Little Money
  373. 12. Spending Too Much
  374. 13. Raising Too Much Money
  375. 14. Poor Investor Management
  376. 15. Sacrificing Users to (Supposed) Profit
  377. 16. Not Wanting to Get Your Hands Dirty
  378. 17. Fights Between Founders
  379. 18. A Half-Hearted Effort
  380. Notes
  381. Mind the Gap
  382. The Daddy Model of Wealth
  383. Stealing It
  384. The Lever of Technology
  385. Alternative to an Axiom
  386. Notes
  387. How Art Can Be Good
  388. Audience
  389. Error
  390. Making It
  391. Notes
  392. Learning from Founders
  393. Is It Worth Being Wise?
  394. Curve
  395. Split
  396. New
  397. Limits
  398. Recipes
  399. Different
  400. Notes
  401. Why to Not Not Start a Startup
  402. 1. Too young
  403. 2. Too inexperienced
  404. 3. Not determined enough
  405. 4. Not smart enough
  406. 5. Know nothing about business
  407. 6. No cofounder
  408. 7. No idea
  409. 8. No room for more startups
  410. 9. Family to support
  411. 10. Independently wealthy
  412. 11. Not ready for commitment
  413. 12. Need for structure
  414. 13. Fear of uncertainty
  415. 14. Don realize what you e avoiding
  416. 15. Parents want you to be a doctor
  417. 16. A job is the default
  418. Notes
  419. Microsoft is Dead
  420. Notes
  421. Two Kinds of Judgement
  422. The Hackers Guide to Investors
  423. 1. The investors are what make a startup hub.
  424. 2. Angel investors are the most critical.
  425. 3. Angels don like publicity.
  426. 4. Most investors, especially VCs, are not like founders.
  427. 5. Most investors are momentum investors.
  428. 6. Most investors are looking for big hits.
  429. 7. VCs want to invest large amounts.
  430. 8. Valuations are fiction.
  431. 9. Investors look for founders like the current stars.
  432. 10. The contribution of investors tends to be underestimated.
  433. 11. VCs are afraid of looking bad.
  434. 12. Being turned down by investors doesn mean much.
  435. 13. Investors are emotional.
  436. 14. The negotiation never stops till the closing.
  437. 15. Investors like to co-invest.
  438. 16. Investors collude.
  439. 17. Large-scale investors care about their portfolio, not any individual company.
  440. 18. Investors have different risk profiles from founders.
  441. 19. Investors vary greatly.
  442. 20. Investors don realize how much it costs to raise money from them.
  443. 21. Investors don like to say no.
  444. 22. You need investors.
  445. 23. Investors like it when you don need them.
  446. Notes
  447. An Alternative Theory of Unions
  448. The Equity Equation
  449. Notes
  450. Stuff
  451. Holding a Program in Ones Head
  452. How Not to Die
  453. News from the Front
  454. Notes
  455. How to Do Philosophy
  456. Words
  457. History
  458. Theoretical Knowledge
  459. The Singularity
  460. A Proposal
  461. Notes
  462. The Future of Web Startups
  463. 1. Lots of Startups
  464. 2. Standardization
  465. 3. New Attitude to Acquisition
  466. 4. Riskier Strategies are Possible
  467. 5. Younger, Nerdier Founders
  468. 6. Startup Hubs Will Persist
  469. 7. Better Judgement Needed
  470. 8. College Will Change
  471. 9. Lots of Competitors
  472. 10. Faster Advances
  473. A Series of Tubes
  474. Why to Move to a Startup Hub
  475. Notes
  476. Six Principles for Making New Things
  477. Trolls
  478. Notes
  479. A New Venture Animal
  480. You Weren Meant to Have a Boss
  481. Trees
  482. Corn Syrup
  483. Programmers
  484. Consequences
  485. Notes


Ваше впечатление от этой книги  


Полный текст книги (читать онлайн): Essays

Скачать эту книгу (515k) в формате: fb2, lrf, epub, mobi, txt, html

close [X]

close [X]


Loading...

Комментарии


Ваше имя:     Ваше впечатление от этой книги

Комментарий:


получать комментарии о книге Essays на e-mail

Код авторизации Anti spam Capcha
















Loading...